you're reading...
Festivals and Conferences, Japanese Cinema

LFF 2012 #4: For Love’s Sake (Ai To Makoto, Japan 2012)

Tsumabuki Satoshi as Makoto Taiga, posed with the girls from the ‘trade school’.

Is Takashi Miike the hardest-working man in showbizz? He certainly completes a mind-boggling number of films each year. Very few of them get a cinema screening in the UK, so I was delighted to get the chance to see this in NFT 1, albeit on a French print with burned-in French subs and an extra English subtitle above.

For Love’s Sake (aka The Legend of Love & Sincerity) is a live action adaptation of a manga, although it begins and ends with short anime sequences. (It’s a Kadokawa film from a Kodansha manga – i.e. the Kadokawa parent – but produced for the Toei Studio) That’s the simple part of its definition – placing it generically is more difficult. The central character is Makoto, at 18 a rebellious and violent young man, full of aggression. We meet him on the streets of Tokyo, taking on a whole gang of wild youths single-handed. Surprised by the appearance of Ai, a wealthy and very poised young woman, Makoto allows himself to be taken by the riot police. Ai then determines to use her father’s money and influence to spring Makoto from prison and get him admitted to her exclusive prep school. We know from the anime prologue that Makoto saved Ai’s life eleven years previously when he swore her to secrecy because he didn’t want it known that he’d helped a rich girl. She now recognises him (from the scar on his forehead), but he wants nothing to do with her. The other point to make here is that the time period is supposedly 1972. Since a) most of what follows takes place on highly stylised sets and b) Japanese school uniforms and the outfits of street gangs are more or less timeless, I forget about the time period for the rest of the film.

Takei Emi as Saotome Ai

Perhaps the best way to describe the genre repertoires is Grease-style high-school musical meets Buffy the Vampire-Slayer (but without any supernatural stuff) and a yakuza comedy. Various other Japanese generic characters wander in at various points and the whole is extremely enjoyable. The sets really are wonderful and reminded me a little of Suzuki Seijun films from the 1960s such as Gate of Flesh. Several sequences require characters to burst into songs. I know very little about Japanese pop music but they were easy to listen to and the performers were excellent. The major point about Miike is usually the violence and there is plenty of it here, mostly enormous fistfights and kickings. In this film the female gangs are just as vicious as the male and Makoto fights both with equal gusto. I’m not sure if this suggests sexual equality but once you become inured to the violence through constant repetition, it ceases to be violence at all really – more like a form of aggressive dance choreography. (I wonder if Miike has ever seen the British ‘St Trinian’s girls in films – schoolgirls with hockey sticks instead of baseball bats?) The plot requires Makoto to get involved (against his will) with two other young women and Ai has her own unwanted suitor in the form of a geeky character who reminded me of a less quirky/comical Richard Aoyade (Moss in The IT Crowd on UK TV). In the end we discover the real reason for Makoto’s aggression.

Makoto is played by Tsumabuki Satoshi, who I later realised had played the lead in Villain (2010). At 31 he is considerably older than the teenage Takei Emi who plays Ai.Wikipedia reveals that the original manga by Kajiwara Ikki was published in 1973 and was followed quickly by an audio (radio?) version, a TV adaptation and three live action film versions, all produced in the 1970s, which explains the setting.

I can’t really think of a better recommendation than to suggest that the film is constantly entertaining throughout its 130 mins running time. I assume that it will become available on DVD, but if you get the chance, see it on the biggest screen possible in order to appreciate the sets and the ‘Scope compositions from Miike’s current cinematographer Kita Nobuyasu.

Here’s a trailer with English subs:

Discussion

One thought on “LFF 2012 #4: For Love’s Sake (Ai To Makoto, Japan 2012)

  1. I want to see this. Thanks for the posts.

    Posted by Dentist Yorkville | October 18, 2012, 15:37

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow itpworld on Twitter

Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 318 other followers

Archives

%d bloggers like this: