you're reading...
Nordic Cinema

Nordic Noir, Noomi Rapace and Remakes

In a couple of months time, David Fincher’s remake of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo will hit cinema screens. I’m already on record as saying that this kind of instant remake (i.e. of a recent hit non-English language film) is pointless and I stick to that view. However, we can’t just wish Hollywood away. The domination of so many film markets by American product is a part of most filmgoers’ experience – and that goes for filmmakers too, both directors and actors who want to work internationally and Nordic facilities that want to attract international productions to their region. I’m not sure yet whether I will go to a cinema to see the Fincher film, but I am going to revive my interest in the Stieg Larsson Millennium trilogy and a range of associated issues. The interest in Nordic cinema and TV in the UK shows no signs of melting away and next term I’ll be teaching a course on ‘Nordic Noir’. The furore over the remake (the European jibes about Anglos who won’t read subtitles and the American jibes about ‘cheap’ European films) is evident on the comments on YouTube for the trailers. I guess that I am going to have to see the Hollywood film, which was shot in Sweden, just to see what it does differently. Here is the Sony trailer for the remake with the original trailer for the Swedish film below:

 

 

 

On October 7, a film called Babycall opened in Norway. It stars Noomi Rapace (the ‘original’ Lisbeth Salander) in her first post-Millennium role as a mother who takes her young son out of Oslo away from a violent father. She buys a ‘babycall’ device to keep tabs on her son when he is in the flat but the device also picks up other children’s voices. Is her imagination playing tricks? I haven’t seen the film yet, but according to IMDB it has been picked up by Soda for UK distribution in 2012 and I’ll certainly give it a go – it sounds as if writer-director Pål Sletaune is working in a similar way to the Japanese duo Suzuki Koji and Nakata Hideo with Dark Water (Japan 2002). Here’s a Norwegian teaser (the release date was obviously changed) – it’s easy to get a sense of the film without English subs.

 

 

Before Babycall reaches the UK, Noomi Rapace will get much more exposure in her first Hollywood blockbuster, Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows in which she plays a European woman caught up in the struggle between Holmes and Watson and their deadly foe Professor Moriarty. This of course means that Ms Rapace has fallen into the clutches of Guy Ritchie. Here’s the trailer:

 

 

In June 2012, Noomi Rapace’s second Hollywood blockbuster appears in the shape of Ridley Scott’s Prometheus, billed as a science fiction/horror film and talked about as Alien-related. Certain casting decisions suggest an influence of Danny Boyle’s approach in Sunshine with Benedict Wong in a small role and Michelle Yeoh allegedly up for a part at an early stage. Jude Law from Sherlock Holmes has a lead role.

Meanwhile the fascination with Nordic Noir continues with the first film to arrive in the UK adapted from the work of the Norwegian writer Jo Nesbø. Headhunters is a Nesbo crime thriller that doesn’t feature Harry Hole, the Oslo detective who has become the latest literary hero. Instead it is a story about a man who works as a ‘headhunter’ for businesses and operates a sideline in art thefts. In Norway, the film has already become one of the major hits of the year and it is currently screening during the London Film Festival with a UK release planned for April 2012 – and yes, the US remake via Summit, the independent behind the Twilight films is already announced. This marks the beginning of a long-term relationship between Swedish producers Yellow Bird and Summit which could yet see European productions of English-language crime dramas set in North America. Yellow Bird has already made the Wallander series in English for the BBC and as co-producer of the Millennium films and TV series it has worked with Scott Rudin to produce the Fincher take on The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.

Jo Nesbø looks like becoming the next Henning Mankell or Stieg Larsson as a source for international crime thrillers. Harry Hole is much more action-driven than Wallander and much sexier than Mikael Blomkvist. Nesbø reportedly doesn’t like the Larsson comparison, but for filmmakers he has one major attraction – he’s still alive and is still writing (and he has a big back catalogue).

Here’s the Norwegian Headhunters trailer (no English subs yet):

 

 

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow itpworld on Twitter

Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 309 other followers

Archives

%d bloggers like this: